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You can’t do that! Keeping your events Code compliant
Ethics, culture and lactation: essential concepts and principles for lactation specialists
Spotlight on infant formula: why action to tackle the harmful practices of companies is needed
The commercialization of human milk

 

You can’t do that! Keeping your events Code compliant

by Jodine Chase
1.25 E CERPS and 1.25 pre-exam education hours

You’re planning an event for World Breastfeeding Week. You’ve got a great team and lots of local support. But the gift bag coordinator says a local store wants to include a nipple cream sample. The local chiropractor coupon, is that a no? What about the milk bank info sheet, yes? Someone wants to raffle off a breast pump? Now your head is spinning. Sponsors, giveaways, brochures, how do you deal with it all while ensuring you or your group doesn’t get involved in controversy over unethical marketing and Code violations? This presentation explained how to host a Code compliant event that doesn’t contribute to predatory marketing Booby Traps that erode breastfeeding.

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Ethics, culture and lactation: essential concepts and principles for lactation specialists

by Cynthia Good Mojab, MS, IBCLC, RLC, CATSM
2.00 E CERPS and 2.00 pre-exam education hours

This session introduces ethical and cultural concepts and principles that are essential for ethical decision making in cross-cultural lactation counseling and consulting settings anywhere in the world. It includes a review of cultural dimensions which impact lactation and lactation counseling and consulting; principles within the Code of Professional Conduct that mandate cultural competence; how ethical issues interact with non-universal, culturally-based values and beliefs in lactation counseling and consulting; and fundamental principles that lactation specialists must apply when working to resolve ethical dilemmas in cross-cultural settings. A case study illustrates the application of these ethical and cultural concepts and principles.

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Spotlight on infant formula: why action to tackle the harmful practices of companies is needed

by Alison McFadden, PhD, RM, ADM, Cert Ed
0.75 E CERP and 0.75 pre-exam education hour

Based in part on research conducted in 2014, this presentation will highlight how promotion and marketing activities of breastmilk substitute companies undermine breastfeeding. More specifically it will explore challenges in implementing the International Code on Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes providing specific examples from six countries: Bangladesh, Brazil, Indonesia, Nigeria, the Philippines and the UK. The presentation will emphasise the need for co-ordinated action to address these challenges and make suggestions for how this could be achieved.

The commercialization of human milk

by Jodine Chase
1.25 E CERPS and 1.25 pre-exam education hours

Non-profit human milk banks in North America dispensed over 4 million ounces of human milk in 2015 for infants in need. That sounds like a lot of milk, and it is an increase of 10 fold since the turn of the century. But in the same year, two competing US companies say they processed a similar amount of milk for commercial human milk products. One says they bought 1 million ounces at $1/oz that year. And a third company that offers a web-based brokerage for private buyers and sellers claims to have 10,000 ads offering 45 million ounces of milk at any given time. A Utah-based company is paying women in Cambodia for their milk and reselling it in the US. Infant formula companies are looking to extract human milk components to enhance their products, and the for-profit trend is expanding beyond the US’s borders into Canada, Australia, and beyond. Learn more about this human milk marketplace – what are the products being sold, and how to do they compare to traditional human donor milk? What are the options for families that wish to donate or sell milk, and for those in need?

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